Posted by: cousinbrandon | May 13, 2009

LOST – Season 5, Episode 16 (Part 1): “The Incident”

Too much to post as a single entry, so the finale is broken down into Parts 1 and 2.

I know, I know.  As much as you’d been looking to the LOST season finale was equaled only by your anticipation of my post on “The Incident,” the final, two-hour installment of Season 5.  Well, here’s the thing:  on the night of the finale, I went to sleep 15 minutes into the episode.  Don’t misunderstand, though; I didn’t watch 15 minutes and decide that I’d had enough.  No, I was simply too tired to invest two hours of concentration in what would prove to be an epic season finale, and therefore didn’t watch any of it until yesterday morning, squeezing in the first hour on my home computer and hour two at work, where I’m currently typing.  Furthermore, I re-watched the finale last night, pen pressed to paper, and jotted out an astounding four full pages of notes (double my typical amount, but seeing as how the episode was twice as long, I supposed it all makes sense).  Now I don’t want to say I’m obsessed with LOST or anything, but I actually dreamed last night about the finale’s final scene.  (Yeah, I’m a nerd.)  Because the finale was so jam-packed with jaw-dropping revelations, fantastic lines of dialogue, and, unfortunately, shoot-outs, I’m simply going step-by-step to recount the darn thing.  So, I advise you now to put aside some time, as this recap is going to be – how should I put it – long.  With that, I give you my take on “The Incident,” beginning with…

1. Jacob.  We open on a man working on a loom, though it’s unclear as to what he’s making.  Based on the setting and glyphs on the wall, we assume the man is inside the Temple, or perhaps even the tunnels.  This mysterious, white-clad man (who, by the way, is a total “that guy” whose face I knew but name I couldn’t place) makes his way to the beach, where he retrieves a caught fish, filets it, and cooks over a hot stone.  As he eats his fish, he watches a boat sailing in the distance, which I can only assume is the Black Rock.  (Incidentally, I’d be curious as to whether or not Richard’s ship in a bottle is a replica of this ocean-sailing vessel.)  The man in white is joined by another man, coincidentally (yeah, right) dressed in black.  Neither seem particularly alarmed by the approaching vessel, yet the man in black is clearly angered by its presence, as it promises to bring war and corruption.  The man in white considers these to be signs of “progress,” and is therefore accepting of its arrival.  The man in black tells the other man, “Do you know how badly I want to kill you,” implying not only a longtime association between the two men, but insinuating that he is actually incapable of killing the man in white for one reason for another.  As the man in black takes his leave, he says, “Nice talking to you, Jacob.”  ZING!  (And by the way, I guess this squelches my Jack is Jacob theory, huh?)  But rather than giving us the “man” in black’s name, Jacob simply responds, “It was nice talking to you, too.”  As the camera pulls back, we realize that Jacob is sitting beneath the shadow of the still-standing Egyptian statue, the same one we saw earlier this season when Sawyer and crew were in the midst of non-stop leaps.  In the statue’s right hand is an ankh, confirming not only its Egyptian roots, but calling back to Paul’s necklace.  And the ankh, if you recall, was a symbol of both life and death, light and dark, male and female.  In other words, it was a sign of balance, an all too familiar theme on LOST, personified in this very scene by the man in white (Jacob) and the man in black.  I have a long, interesting theory about this “man” in black that I will get to later, as we’ll see “him” again (sort of).  First, let’s travel back in time to…

2. Little Katie Austen.  Outside of a rural general store, a young girl and boy determine who is going to do the dirty work and who is going to serve as lookout.  Quite obviously we’re looking at a young Kate and her childhood boyfriend, Tom, so indicated by the fact that A) the girl looks just like Kate; and B) the boy is holding the toy plane Kate would retrieve from a security deposit box in Season 1.  Inside, Tom stands lookout as Kate stuffs a New Kids On the Block lunchbox into her backpack.  (And by the way, I’d really hate to think there’s any significance to a NKOTB lunchbox, although this being LOST, I’ll make a stab and suggest it’s fitting, as Kate and company will eventually be the “new kids” on the island, thus fulfilling her role as a member of the “new kids on the block.”  I hate myself right now.)  Kate is busted by the store owner, but before he can call the cops a man intervenes and offers to pay for the lunchbox.  The man is none other than Jacob, who crouches down and asks her, “You’re not gonna’ steal any more, are you?”  She says she won’t (um, how’d that work out for you, Kate?), and Jacob touches her nose, saying, “Be good, Katie.”  Be “good,” huh?  Clearly that was an intentional choice of words, as we know how wrapped up the writers are with the notion of “good” and “bad,” and seeing as how this is Jacob, well, it was no accident.  We flash forward to…

3. Big Kate Austen.  Kate, Sawyer and Juliet are handcuffed on the inside of the sub, making their way to the mainland and away from the island for good.  Kate tries to convince them that they have to go back to stop Jack (ironic, no, seeing as how Jack once convinced Kate that they had to go back), who is planning to blow up the island.  Sawyer, though, isn’t interested, and instead wants to get as far away from the island as possible.  When the DHARMA crew member arrives with the sedatives they’re to take, Juliet goes all Sayid on him and knocks the man unconscious, stealing his keys and unlocking his cuffs.  A stunned Sawyer can’t understand what she’s doing, but Juliet insists that they can’t just let the on-island people die, which makes sense considering that she, too, is a doctor, and has a natural instinct to save lives rather than take them.  Sawyer reluctantly agrees, and the three of them order the sub captain, at gunpoint, to surface the sub, drop them off, and get the other folks on board as far away as possible.  Well, looks like Juliet, Kate and Sawyer are going back after all.  And speaking of the aforementioned instrument of death…

4. Jack and the Bomb-Stalk.  Okay, that was bad.  Jack, Sayid, Richard and Ellie are studying Jughead.  Jack points out that it might be “difficult” to move a bomb this size.  Fortunately, according to Faraday’s journal, they can remove the core as opposed to hauling the entire bomb to the Swan site.  Richard points out that this might not be a good idea, considering it was leaking radioactive materials and Ellie is pregnant (with the child who will write the instructions they are currently following, no less).  Sayid manages to remove the core.  Richard makes a point of asking Jack about a man named John Locke, who came into his camp 20 years ago.  Richard says that he’s visited Locke off-island several times, yet he never seemed “special.”  A smirking Jack replies, “I wouldn’t give up on him.”  Again, I’ve really enjoyed watching Jack’s transformation this season from a man of science to a man of faith, so much so that he’s actually defending the teachings of a “crazy man” in John Locke.  Meanwhile, on the other side of the island…

5. The Swan.  Radzinksy arrives at the Swan site, intent on knowing just who the hell stopped drilling.  Pierre Chang responds that it was he who stopped the drilling based on the core temperature, which was excessively hot.  Radzinsky, in what has become his typical, jerky demeanor, explains that he’s spent six years designing a station to manipulate electromagnetism, and he intends to complete his experiment at any cost.  With that, he fires the drill back up to the chagrin of Dr. Chang.  From there we move ahead, way ahead, to…

6. Thirty Years Later.  Locke, Richard, Ben, Sun and the rest of the Others continue their trek to Jacob.  Sun, who has become, well, pretty awful of late in terms of character development and dialogue, asks Ben as to the identity of Jacob.  “I don’t know, Sun,” Ben answers, “I’ve never met him.”  Richard, who has been staring at Locke “for the last ten minutes,” wants to know how Locke is alive.  Locke responds that Richard’s been on the island for a long time, and if anything it’s Richard who should know the answer to that.  Richard confirms that, yes, he has been there a long time, and he is the way he is because of Jacob.  Locke, in a, shall we say, grotesquely Ben-like manner, tells Richard that “We’re going to have to deal with the rest of the passengers who brought me here.”  Richard wants to know what Locke means by “deal” with them.  In a cold, calculated manner, Locke simply responds, “You know what I mean.”  Last time I checked, “dealing” with people meant murdering them.  Is this what Locke’s become?  Well, not really, as this will all-too-soon confirm my theory from weeks ago that this isn’t Locke we’re seeing, and he is, in fact, dead.  But we’ll get there.  First, let’s check on those who need to be dealt with, in the form of…

7. Ilana and the Crate.  Ilana, Bram and crew paddle onto shore, accompanied by the crate and an unconscious Frank Lapidus.  Bram can’t understand why they brought Lapidus along, and asks Ilana, “Do you think he’s a candidate?”  Lapidus wakes up, and wants to know what Bram means by “candidate.”  Furthermore, he wants to know what’s in the box.  Ilana looks to Bram, who defers back to Ilana and says it’s her call.  The crate is opened, and although we don’t see the contents I knew immediately what was inside, but we’ll get to that little tidbit later.  First, though, let’s take a stroll down memory lane, particularly to…

8. James Ford, Orphan.  Two caskets are being led out of a church as a young boy (presumably Sawyer) looks on.  The boy sits on the church steps and begins writing, only to find that his pen isn’t working properly.  Jacob appears and asks if James needs a pen.  During the exchange, their hands touch briefly.  Jacob takes his leave and we see that Sawyer is writing the letter to Mr. Sawyer, the one he will eventually carry around with him for the rest of his life.  A man, likely a relative of James’, approaches and asks to see what the young boy is writing.  He reads it aloud and tells the boy he understands his being mad as hell, but that he needs to move on.  “What’s done is done,” he tells James.  (I suppose that’s just another way of saying “Whatever happened, happened,” huh?)  He makes James promise he’ll never finish writing the letter, and even though James agrees, we know that he, like Katie Austen, won’t keep his promise.  We then return/go forward to…

9. Locke’s Plan.  Locke stops Ben to ask him why he hasn’t told Richard about his plan to murder Jacob.  Ben points out that Richard wouldn’t believe him, to which Locke greatly responds, “When did that ever stop you?”  Ben tells Locke that he’ll do whatever Locke says.  When Locke asks for an explanation as to why, Ben tells him that ever since his dead daughter Alex appeared to him below the temple, he was instructed to follow Locke’s lead at all cost.  This is good news to Locke, as he won’t have to convince Ben now.  “Convince me to do what?” asks Ben.  Again, in the newfound, confident delivery that has been a trademark of Locke all season, he responds, “I’m not going to kill Jacob, Ben; you are!”  Double-ZING!  We go back in time again to…

10. Sayid and Nadia.  Sayid and Nadia walk lovingly to a crosswalk in Los Angeles.  As they make their way into the street, Jacob stops Sayid, touches his arm, and asks for directions, telling him he’s not familiar with Los Angeles.  Nadia, who stopped in the road, turns to face Sayid, only to be run over by a car, as described back in Season 4.  Sayid immediately runs to Nadia, who lies in the middle of the road, blood splattered across her face.  A dying Nadia can only muster, “Take me home.  Take me home.”  This, of course, was fulfilled by Sayid, who returned her to her homeland and carried her casket in the funeral procession, before eventually murdering the man responsible for running over Nadia.  So, once again, we’re just now seeing the events that we know have led to other flashbacks/flashforwards on LOST.  From here we move to…

11. The Barracks, 1977.  Sayid packages the bomb core in a backpack.  Richard leads Jack, Sayid and Ellie to a hollow wall, which he busts through with a sledgehammer.  Jack explains his plan, only to have Ellie interrupt, insisting that it’s she who’s in charge.  As she begins to make her way through the crumbled wall, Richard knocks her out with the butt of his gun.  Richard insists that he’s protecting his leader, and sends Jack and Sayid through the wall alone.  In order to make their way through the DHARMA camp, which is in the midst of panic and chaos, alarms and all, Sayid suggests they hide in plain sight, donning DHARMA jumpsuits in order to pass through unnoticed.  Unfortunately, they are noticed by none other than Roger Linus, who recognizes Sayid as the Hostile who shot his son.  Sayid warns Roger to put his gun down, as he is carrying a nuclear device.  Enraged and deaf to his wishes, Roger shoots Sayid in the stomach, igniting an all-out shootout in the midst of the compound.  Jack manages to pull Sayid to safety, and the two of them are rescued by Hurley, Jin and Miles, who are driving one of the DHARMA vans.  Safe for the moment, we hop over to the other side of the island, specifically…

12. Rose and Bernard.  Kate, Juliet and Sawyer paddle onto shore as a seemingly distressed and sad Juliet watches the sub resurface.  While they don’t recognize where they are, one thing they do recognize is Vincent, who runs to them from out of the jungle.  But what’s Vincent doing out there alone?  Well, he’s not alone, as who should follow him out from the jungle but the long lost couple of Rose and a heavily-bearded Bernard, who greets the three of them with a Sawyer-esque “Son of a bitch.”  Rose and Bernard explain that they’ve been living alone in the jungle for the past three years, as this is the sort of beach-front “paradise” most people would kill for.  Sawyer explains that they’ve spent all this time looking for the two of them, to which Rose says she knows, and that they chose to stay hidden.  When Kate tells them that Jack has a bomb, Rose responds by saying, “Who cares?”  As Bernard puts it, if they die, they die.  All they care about is being together.  In this moment, an incredibly touched Juliet looks to Sawyer, only to find that it’s not her he’s looking at, but Kate.  Ouch!  All say their goodbyes, with Rose and Bernard staying behind to accept whatever hand they’re dealt.  Back to the future, where we find…

13. Ilana and the Cabin.  Ilana, Bram, Frank and company are trudging through the jungle, crate in tow.  Bram explains to Frank that “We’re the good guys,” which of course makes Frank suspect.  They arrive at their destination, which is the dilapidated cabin of Jacob.  Bram points out that the ash surrounding the cabin has been compromised, as there is clearly a “path” of ash missing from the circle.  Ilana instructs them to wait as she makes her way to the cabin.  Meanwhile, we cut to a quick flashback of Ilana, who is laid up in a hospital bed and heavily bandaged about the face, revealing only her eye (naturally) and mouth.  The nurse arrives to inform Ilana she has a visitor, who is none other than Jacob.  Jacob apologizes for not coming sooner, and eventually asks for her help, to which she agrees.  (So far, this is the first of the Jacob flashbacks involving any of our regular cast in which one of them knew Jacob.  Hmmm….)  Cut back to Ilana entering Jacob’s cabin, which appears to have been destroyed by a fire (which it was).  Ilana is about to take her leave, but not before finding a parchment pinned to the wall by Jacob’s machete.  She exits and tells her crew that someone else has been “using” the cabin.  (This someone else, I’m guessing, is Christian.)  Ilana shows Bram the parchment, which is a depiction of the Egyptian statue.  This, then, indicates where they’re going next, but not before they set fire to the cabin.  From here we flash back to…

14. The Fall.  We pull away from a park bench, where Jacob is reading Flannery O’Connor’s Everything That Rises Must Converge.  Now, for those of you not familiar with Flannery O’Connor, she was a famed Southern writer deeply concerned with her Roman Catholic faith, morality and ethics.  What’s more, her stories often featured not only regional, southern settings, but horrible and grotesque people.  One of her great aims in literature was to expose people as sinners, something that seemed to go overlooked as far as she was concerned.  The book in question opens with the story “Everything That Rises Must Converge,” a story about racism and racial integration, and ends with the appropriately titled “Judgment Day.”  It seems fitting, then, that Jacob is reading this book, overflowing with allusions to faith and sinners, when John Locke literally falls (to what should have been his death) behind him.  The fall, in this case, was the result of Locke’s father pushing him from his apartment window several stories up.  Additionally, though, the fall in this case personifies man’s fall from grace as a result of original sin, a topic already touched on in the LOST canon.  A calm and collected Jacob stands up, approaches Locke, and touches him, miraculously reviving Locke from certain death.  “I’m sorry this happened to you,” Jacob says, a line that goes much further and much deeper than the surface of this incident in particular, as it suggests Jacob is sorry for the life Locke has been dealt.  And speaking of Locke, we move to…

15. Locke and the 815 Camp.  Locke leads his “people” to the site of their old camp and tells them to take a rest.  Locke approaches Ben, who is sitting in the sand in front of the Hatch’s “Quarantine” door, the place where the two of them first met.  In what may have been the episode’s funniest line, Locke says to Ben, “Can I ask you a question,” to which Ben immediately responds, “I’m a Pisces.”  Hilarious.  (By the way, it’s no surprise that he’s a Pisces considering the religious themes of this episode, which I’ll again get back to later.)  Locke wants to know why Ben pretended to speak to Jacob when they went to the cabin.  A distant Ben answers that he was talking to an empty chair — that he was embarrassed that he’d never seen Jacob.  “I lied,” Ben says.  “”That’s what I do.”  Ben, clearly distraught and even scared, asks why John wants him to kill Jacob.  As Locke explains it, Ben has done nothing but obey Jacob, and how was he repaid for his dedication?  He got cancer, watched his daughter executed, and was banished from the island.  “The question, Ben, is why the hell wouldn’t you want to kill Jacob?”  Good stuff, and a fine example of the tables turning, as it is Locke manipulating Ben, adopting the character trait that has so defined Ben for all this time.  Meanwhile, Sun comes across Aaron’s crib, which she flips over to find Charlie’s “DS” ring, the one that belonged to his grandfather and was bestowed to Charlie by his brother, Liam, way back in “Greatest Hits.”  Finding the ring acts a prompt to…

Stay tuned for Part 2…

Advertisements

Responses

  1. […] to once again question who is really “good” and who is really “bad,” as we know from the season 5 finale that it was Jacob who brought the ship to the island, even though everything “only ends once.” […]

  2. […] open this week not with “new” material, but Ilana’s open eye from the season 5 finale, in which she is bandaged all about the head and visited by Jacob. This time, though, we learn why […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: